Multiple Elementary/Ask Me Chocolates

Lucidchart Document thumbnail
snow ball sale thumbnail
snow ball sale thumbnail
snowsale_3 thumbnail
snap hats thumbnail
Sandy Plot­nikoff  thumbnail
vel­cro burrs thumbnail
trade fair thumbnail
reflec­tive but­tons thumbnail
sub studio thumbnail
cocoa pod mold thumbnail
Ask Me Choco­lates thumbnail
choco­late pour thumbnail
chocolate tasting thumbnail
intestines thumbnail
chocolate tasting thumbnail
trade fair thumbnail
trade fair thumbnail
trade fair thumbnail
trade fair thumbnail
Lucidchart Document
snow ball sale
snow ball sale
snowsale_3
snap hats
Sandy Plot­nikoff
vel­cro burrs
trade fair
reflec­tive but­tons
sub studio
cocoa pod mold
Ask Me Choco­lates
choco­late pour
chocolate tasting
intestines
chocolate tasting
trade fair
trade fair
trade fair
trade fair

Stu­dents from ‘Mul­ti­ple Ele­men­tary’ cre­ate com­po­si­tions with Sandy Plotnikoff’s snap hats. Toronto, 2012.

Sandy Plot­nikoff vis­its the class to make reflec­tive but­tons. Toronto, 2012

Stu­dents from ‘Mul­ti­ple Ele­men­tary’ cre­ate com­po­si­tions with Sandy Plotnikoff’s vel­cro burrs on the Bloor line. Toronto, 2012.

Show­ing off reflec­tive but­tons made with Sandy Plot­nikoff, on the TTC. Toronto, 2012

Sculpt­ing the cocoa pod mold. Toronto, 2012.

Fin­ished sil­i­cone molds for ‘Ask Me Choco­lates’. Toronto, 2012.

The first choco­late pour. Toronto, 2012.

Ask Me Chocolates is an artwork by Helen Reed and Hannah Jickling, in collaboration with a grade 6 class at “Multiple Elementary.” Ask Me Chocolates is a series of limited edition artist multiples, made with both milk and dark chocolate.

A chocolate is never just a chocolate. Chocolates carry stories, like the Easter Bunny fable, and relate to long and rich histories like the importance of cacao beans in Mayan cultures. Cacao travels vast distances, passes through many hands and changes form multiple times before it arrives at our near-by stores. Some chocolate bars hold a mystery – how do they get the caramel inside? Others transmit information about their country of origin and the farmers who harvested the beans.

As artists, researchers, and amateur chocolatiers, we have produced this collection of chocolates as miniature sculptures and story fragments. Like chocolate bars, these multiples are designed for movement and distribution.

Leading up to the making of our Ask Me Chocolates we have been: selling snowballs, using the subway as a studio, and visiting sites of chocolate production. We have learned about trade, artists’ multiples, the history of bathroom humor in art, child slaves in the cacao industry, ‘labourness’ and artists’ interventions into the world of commerce. We are thinking of this as ‘multiple learning.’



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