Production, Value and Consumption

Cloaca No. 5 thumbnail
Cloaca thumbnail
Snow­bank thumbnail
Vik Muniz Wasteland thumbnail
Envi­ron­men­tal Health Clinic Meet­ing thumbnail
Envi­ron­men­tal Health Clinic Meet­ing thumbnail
Den­nis Moore thumbnail
Your Lupins or Your Life thumbnail
Your Lupins or Your Life thumbnail
Cloaca No. 5
Cloaca
Snow­bank
Vik Muniz Wasteland
Envi­ron­men­tal Health Clinic Meet­ing
Envi­ron­men­tal Health Clinic Meet­ing
Den­nis Moore
Your Lupins or Your Life
Your Lupins or Your Life

Wim Delvoye Cloaca No. 5, 2006

Wim Delvoye Cloaca, 2006 (the “prod­uct’)

Diane Bor­sato Snow­bank, 2007

Artist and film maker Vic Muniz trav­els to his native Brazil to col­lab­o­rate with garbage pick­ers in mak­ing vast, heap­ing por­traits.

Natalie Jere­mi­jenko Envi­ron­men­tal Health Clinic Meet­ing, 2008

Natalie Jere­mi­jenko Envi­ron­men­tal Health Clinic Meet­ing, 2008

Den­nis Moore steals lupins from the rich to give to the poor.

Stu­dents from Your Lupins or Your Life res­i­dency sell snow­balls in their neighbourhood

Stu­dents from Your Lupins or Your Life res­i­dency paid to throw snow­balls at con­struc­tion work­ers by their coworkers.

Making art out of garbage might seem like an amusing gag, but questioning the value of cultural and social production is something artists do as much as they create beautiful things. Wim Delvoye‘s cloaca is an uncanny creature of mechanical consumption, literally excreting artistic treasures as biomechanical production.

Diane Borsato‘s transportation and celebration of a snowbank in Toronto embodies a way of seeing how we performatively inscribe value onto the materials around us.

Making art in the “world’s largest trash city,” Vik Muniz generates larger-than-life portraits from mountains of everyday waste, while Natalie Jeremijenko builds a floating Environmental Health Clinic out of the same bottles we might find littering a beach on which to hold meetings and consultations about water systems as a shared commons.

David Hammons’ snowballs for sale inspired a number of discrete gestures by local students. David Hammons talks about why he sold snowballs on the street in this interview.

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Joshua Allan Harris turns worthless plastic bags and valueless subway exhaust into compelling, moving creatures on city streets.

Local Toronto artist Sean Martindale makes interventions on residential street corners, finding value in the abject cracks of city planters and on garbage day’s curb.

Allan McCollum‘s “labor-intensive practice questions the intrinsic value of the unique work of art. McCollum’s installations—fields of vast numbers of small-scale works, systematically arranged—are the product of many tiny gestures, built up over time.”



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