Abjection and Monument

Mended-Spiderweb-19 thumbnail
Unti­tled (Por­trait of Ross in L.A.) thumbnail
Small Things For­got­ten thumbnail
Small Things For­got­ten 2 thumbnail
Small Things For­got­ten 3 thumbnail
Small Things For­got­ten thumbnail
Small Things For­got­ten thumbnail
Claes Old­en­burg Apple Core thumbnail
Evis­cer­a­tion of waited moments thumbnail
Lupins or Your Life thumbnail
Lupins or Your Life thumbnail
Lupins or Your Life  thumbnail
Mended-Spiderweb-19
Unti­tled (Por­trait of Ross in L.A.)
Small Things For­got­ten
Small Things For­got­ten 2
Small Things For­got­ten 3
Small Things For­got­ten
Small Things For­got­ten
Claes Old­en­burg Apple Core
Evis­cer­a­tion of waited moments
Lupins or Your Life
Lupins or Your Life
Lupins or Your Life

Nina Katchadourian Mended Spi­der­web #19 (Laun­dry Line) Cibachrome, 30 x 20 inches, 1998

Felix Gonzalez-Torres Unti­tled (Por­trait of Ross in L.A.), 1991

Kerri Reid Small Things For­got­ten, 2009

Kerri Reid Small Things For­got­ten, 2009

Kerri Reid Small Things For­got­ten, 2009

Kerri Reid Small Things For­got­ten, 2009

Kerri Reid Small Things For­got­ten, 2009

Claes Old­en­burg and Coosje van Bruggen Apple Core, 1992 Cast alu­minum coated with resin and painted with polyurethane enamel 17 ft. 7 in. x 7 ft. 6 in. x 7 ft. 9 in. (5.4 x 2.3 x 2.4 m) (includes remov­able stem 4 ft. 7 in. [1.4 m] high) Col­lec­tion The Israel Museum, Jerusalem Gift of the Mor­ton and Bar­bara Man­del Fund, Man­del Asso­ci­ated Foun­da­tions, Cleve­land, and the artists, to Amer­i­can Friends of the Israel Museum

Stephen Shanabrook Evis­cer­a­tion of waited moments, 1993–1994 Amer­i­can Morgue Choco­lates, impres­sions of wounds cast in dark choco­late, col­ored foil. Ed. of 25; each box: 43 x 48 x 8 cm 16.9 x 18.9 x 3.2 inches

a student’s “lost and found” piece from the Lupins or Your Life Ped­a­gog­i­cal Impulse residency

a student’s “lost and found” poster from the Lupins or Your Life Ped­a­gog­i­cal Impulse residency

a student’s “lost and found” poster from the Lupins or Your Life Ped­a­gog­i­cal Impulse residency

When an object loses its place, it becomes the abject; it slips between boundaries of what is attractive or repulsive, precious or worthless, alive or dead. The abject object moves across such categories while retaining a haunting memory of both belongings — a threat and promise that these categories themselves can be breached.

Scaled up in memory as the subject of art, the abject is memorialized. For example, Nina Katchadourian makes an “uninvited collaboration with nature” to mend a tattered spider’s web, stitching into reality what could easily be forgotten in brightly-coloured thread. 

Félix González-Torres remembers the body, affection and decline of his dead lover by faithfully re-materializing his medically ideal weight as a pile of candies, creating a new body freely offered for the public to take from what they may.

Happening upon a puzzle piece lost in the cold, Kerri Reid constructs a new image and home from its abject conditions, and repackages the imperfect whole by hand. While Reid goes to the trouble of finding a new retail environment for this stranger, Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen enlarges the spat-out remains of an apple core to monumental proportions.

Stephen Shanabrook‘s confectionary impressions of fatal wounds make tangible a thingness so marginal that it can’t be discarded. For Shanabrook, the monument is not something that commemorates a past, but rather a complex material of senses that is indelible in presence, edible in experience, and so elusively delible once again.

The concluding images of this archive offer the “lost and found” posters created by students who retrieved and revalued lost fragments and unnamed entities during a residency.



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